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PM extends condolences to South Korea after stampede

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Cambodian ambassador Chring Botum Rangsay visits the scene of the stampede a day after the October 29 incident. CHRING BOTUM RANGSAY VIA FACEBOOK

PM extends condolences to South Korea after stampede

Prime Minister Hun Sen extended his condolences to the people of South Korea for the October 29 Halloween stampede which killed at least 154 people, in Seoul’s Itaewon district.

In a letter to South Korean President Yoon Suk Yeol, Hun Sen said that he was deeply saddened to learn about the tragic accident.

“On behalf of the Royal Government and people of Cambodia, I would like to extend my deepest condolences and sympathy to Your Excellency and, through you, to the people of South Korea, particularly the bereaved families for their loss.

“Cambodia is with you in this sorrowful moment. I also wish a speedy recovery to those who are injured,” he wrote.

The Cambodian embassy in South Korea will fly its flag at half mast for six days to mark a period of mourning and pay tribute to those who lost their lives. The embassy said no Cambodians had been affected.

Cambodian ambassador Chring Botum Rangsay, who went to view the scene on October 30, said the place was quiet, with only a few curious onlookers and the media.

“There was a young man sobbing by the side of the sidewalk. I presume he was at the incident that night or had friend who was a victim. It was surreal to think about what had happened there. Just hours before, there were bodies lying on the streets that I was walking on,” she said.

“We continue to pray for those who lost their lives and were injured in the Itaewon stampede.

“From October 31 to November 5, we will lower our flags out of respect for the deceased. We stand in solidarity with South Korea,” she said.

Korean media reported that authorities have yet to determine the cause of the stampede, but were continuing to investigate. Eyewitnesses described how many young people were celebrating Halloween in the narrow alley on the night of the incident.

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